Judi Harvest

Cross-Pollination: Honeybees and Murano Glass

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Venice Glass Week

Propagation: Bees + Seeds participated in the inaugural edition of The Venice Glass Week. Also as part of The Venice Glass Week, Judi Harvest hosted a panel discussion of the role and importance of honeybees in our environment, and the relations between art, nature and Murano glass.

Saturday, September 16, 2017
Istituto Veneto di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti
Palazzo Franchetti, Sala del Portego San Marco 2847, Venice.

Press Releases | English PDF | Italian PDF

Panel Discussion Participants:

Judith Harvest – Artist and Beekeeper, New York – Venezia
Andrea Grigoletto – Director, Fenice Green Energy Park, Padova
Lorenzo Bonometto – Founder, Società Veneziana di Scienze Naturali, Venice
Giorgio Giuman – Glass Master, owner, Giorgio Giuman glass factory, Murano
Bruno Amadi – Glass Master, Venice
Vittorio Costantini – Glass Master, Venice
Roger Repohl – Beekeeper and language professor, New York
Luca Polo – Beekeeper, Murano and Mestre, Venice
Gianni Pozzani – Beekeeper, Art Historian, Murano glass Cameo technique, Verona

The crucial decline of honeybees has several culprits, including GMO crops, the use of neurotoxic pesticides, stress and lack of biodiversity in their diet. The panel not only aims to raise public awareness about the global threat to nature due to honeybee losses, but also to discuss practical solutions, along with the relationship of art, nature and the similarities to Murano glass makers. The panel will bring awareness to these two colonies of beauty which have more in common than meets the eye.

This conversation was first presented as part of the exhibition, Denatured: Honeybees + Murano, 2013, by Judi Harvest in partnership with the non-profit organization Bees Without Borders, dedicated to promoting beekeeping for the purpose of combating hunger in the world. Judi has worked with Bees Without Borders since 2006.

Last Updated on Thursday, 12 October 2017 15:02

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Propagation: Bees + Seeds

During this year’s Venice Art Biennale, artist Judi Harvest displays glasswork, paintings and a video installation in PROPAGATION: Bees + Seeds, part of Beauty and the Beast, an exhibition in Palazzo Tiepolo Passi, 2774 San Polo, Venice. The show runs May 10 through November 26, 2017. 

Venice Glass Week

Video of honeybee conference

Propagation: Bees + Seeds participated in the inaugural edition of The Venice Glass Week. As part of The Venice Glass Week, Judi Harvest hosted a panel discussion of the role and importance of honeybees in our environment, and the relations between art, nature and Murano glass:

Watch the video of the 
Cross-Pollination: Honeybees and Murano Glass
panel discussion here

 

Harvest’s new works are a rumination on seeds, bee pollination and plants as metaphors for life and renewal. The exhibition is imbued with the spirit of the flowers and plants in the Honey Garden Harvest planted in Murano in 2013. 

The work is also inspired by global seed banks, like the world’s largest, the Svalbard Global Seed Vault in Norway. Harvest created over 150 different glass seeds, plants and flowers to highlight the beauty, purpose and sacred symbolism of seeds and vegetables. She showcases the beauty of a glass artichoke or pomegranate seed, but also the intricate artistry that glassmakers practice to create form and reimagine nature. Her work is a comment on how global demand for foods or spices is unrealistic, damaging to nature’s seasonal order, and ultimately a threat to the bees that pollinate the world’s crops. 

For PROPAGATION, Harvest worked with seven Murano glass masters, employing three ancient and challenging Murano glass techniques: cera persa (lost wax), lume (flame work), and soffiato (blown).  For over forty years Harvest has lived, worked and exhibited her art in Venice. She worked for the last 28 years in a Murano glass factory owned by Giorgio Giuman, which went from employing 75 people to a mere four. She began to see parallels between the disappearing bees and Murano’s disappearing glass-making families. She has had many exhibitions in Venice, including 2015’s Room of Dreams  and her massive 2013 exhibition DENATURED: Honeybees + Murano, for which she created 100 amber toned glass Honey Vessels, other honeybee-related paintings and sculptures, and the permanent installation Honey Garden, a bee-friendly garden which has transformed the grounds of Giuman’s glass factory. The garden is home to six healthy honeybee hives which produce the first Murano honey.

Limited edition pieces available from PROPAGATION exhibition:

Seeds are Jewels boxes
Archival Photos on metal
Scarf
Pocket square
Catalog
DVD
Other artworks by request 

Download Propagation press release
Download Beauty and the Beast press release

 

 

 

 

 

Last Updated on Friday, 13 October 2017 04:37

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Murano Honey Garden

2013 – present

On the grounds of the Linea Arianna glass factory on the island of Sacca Serenella in Murano.

250-square-meter field, with a desingned environment of 30 fruit trees and 500 fragrant, flowering plants and five fully functioning beehives. 

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/honeygardenmurano/

Directions for visiting the HONEY GARDEN in Murano:
Linea Arianna, Sacca Serenella 14, Murano, Venezia
Tel: 041-736619
Vaporetto to Serenella:
From San Marco – LINE 4.1
From P.le Roma/Ferrovia - LINE 4.2 or LINE 3
From Fond.te Nove – LINE 4.1 or LINE 4.2 

Download map

 

Murano Honey Garden earthworks installation, on the grounds of the Linea Arianna glass factory on the island of Sacca Serenella in Murano, Venetzia, Italia.

Judi Harvest: "March 21, 2013, I began the Honey Garden on the grounds of the Linea Arianna glass factory in Sacca Serenella as the permanent part of my site specific installation, “Denatured: Honeybees + Murano.” Six boatloads of soil, 100 carpets of sod, 500 flowering plants, 30 fruit trees, a crane and a 100 year old pomegranate tree later, we installed 4 honeybee families in brightly colored hives. By August, 2013 the garden produced over 60 nectarines and 60 kilos of honey, pomegranates and picnics."

Before (March 2013):

grounds of the Linea Arianna glass factory on the island of Sacca Serenella in Murano

Honey Garden - planting

Honey Garden plants - unloading barge

First growth (May 2013):

March 21, 2013, I began the Honey Garden on the grounds of the Linea Arianna glass factory in Sacca Serenella as the permanent part of my site specific installation, “Denatured: Honeybees + Murano.”

Honey Garden - beekeepers

Judi harvesting honey

Honey from the Honey Garden

2016-Murano-Honey-Garden

2016-Murano-Honey-Garden

Last Updated on Tuesday, 31 May 2016 21:34

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Edible Icons

2016

Art on A Gallery, New York, USA

Part of an exhibition celebrating the release of the documentary Streit's Matzo and the American Dream


Edible Icons are real Matzos covered with gold leaf in a labor intensive process, taking up to one month to complete. Each Matzo is unique. The surfaces change and mysteriously look like ancient tablets when photographed.

Matzos are the first fast food. They cook for only 18 minutes. I create a signed, limited edition of 18 Edible Icons every year. The number 18 means life in Hebrew. Bread is fundamental in every culture; French bread, Italian bread, fortune cookies...

Matzos are a symbol of freedom since they were created by the Jewish people during the exodus from Egypt as something quick and durable to eat in the desert.

Edible Icons are in both public and private collections all over the world and are known to bring good luck to all who own them.

—Judi Harvest

 Edible Icons - golf leafed matzos

 

Edible Icons gold leafed matzos 

 

POstcard announcement

Last Updated on Monday, 30 May 2016 21:46

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Cosmic Serenade

Curated by Silvana Miniardis

Venice Design Art Gallery, Venice, Italy

2005

 

Last Updated on Saturday, 28 May 2016 23:08

Hits: 381

© 2017 Judi Harvest

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